Loading
September 09, 2011
September 11th 2001: Anger and forgiveness
By Father Robert Barron *

By Father Robert Barron *

The tenth anniversary of September 11th, 2001 falls on a Sunday and, providentially, the readings proposed for the Catholic liturgy that day have to do with forgiveness.  This interesting confluence provides the occasion for reflecting on this complex and oft-misunderstood spiritual act.

Let’s begin by remembering the terrible day.  I was at my computer on that crystal clear early autumn morning when I received a call from a friend who said, “a plane just flew into one of the World Trade Center towers.”  I immediately thought of a small plane, which had tragically lost its way, like the one that crashed into the Empire State Building in the 1930s.  I ran to my room, turned on the television and saw what in fact had taken place.  My first reaction was to wonder how in the world the fire fighters would ever put out a blaze that far up on the building.  I then crossed the campus to teach my class and I found the students huddled around the television.  We all watched as the two towers crumbled to dust, and I will admit that I didn’t quite know what I was seeing.  They say that when the Spanish caravels first arrived on the shores of the New World, the native people didn’t really see them, for they had no frame of reference for such things.  My seeing but not understanding the collapse of the towers was something like that.  My students and I just stood in silence for several minutes and then one of them said, “the world just got about ten thousand times worse.”

Osama bin Laden and those wicked men who hijacked the planes on September 11th not only killed 3000 people; they also haunted and terrified the rest of the world.  We feel this in our bones and we remember it every time we go to the airport and are compelled to remove our shoes and belts and submit to humiliating body searches, etc. 

Were we and are we legitimately angry about September 11th?  Absolutely.  Thomas Aquinas said that anger is the natural response to injustice, for it is the passion to set things right.  Martin Luther King was angry at racial inequality in mid-twentieth century America; Gandhi was angry at the injustices born of British imperialism; John Paul II was angry at Communist oppression in his native Poland—and they were all justified in their anger.  This is why the Bible coherently speaks of God’s anger.  It doesn’t mean that God passes into an emotional snit; it means that God consistently desires to make right a world gone wrong.  Can anger legitimately conduce toward the prosecution of criminals, the formulation of tough laws, the imprisonment of dangerous people?  Yes indeed.

But in contradistinction to legitimate anger, there is what the Catholic tradition calls the “deadly sin” of anger.  This is an exaggerated or irrational desire for vengeance, a passion that is untethered to love.  Love, of course, is not an emotion, but rather a determination of desire, an active willing of the good of another.  King didn’t want to destroy White America; he wanted to redeem it; Gandhi didn’t want to annihilate the British; he wanted to convert them and see them off as friends; John Paul II didn’t want to kill the Communists; he wanted them to become better people.  In all of these cases, anger was situated in the more fundamental matrix of love. 

In light of these clarifications, we can begin to understand what Jesus means by forgiveness.  Authentic forgiveness has nothing to do with willful ignorance (“forgive and forget”) or with a pollyannaish wishing away of evil.  In point of fact, real forgiveness assumes a frank and realistic knowledge of wrongs committed and is accordingly accompanied by legitimate anger.  But it is indeed incompatible with the desire for vengeance or, to say the same thing, with the deadly sin of anger, for forgiveness is always an act of love, willing the good of the other.  The author of the book of Sirach beautifully catches the negativity of anger:  “Wrath and anger are hateful things, yet the sinner hugs them tight.”  The deadly sin of anger actually feeds the ego and its needs in the measure that it convinces the angry person of his moral superiority.  We sinners remember old hurts, rehearse the offenses of others, and cling to our resentments so as to put ourselves on a pedestal.  Accordingly, we hold tight to our anger and utterly forsake the path of love.  Forgiveness stands athwart such a move.

One way to practice forgiveness is to say, in regard to any hurt, insult, or injustice that has been done to you, “this is our problem,” that is to say, a problem that has to be solved both by you and by the person who has offended you.  This is not to indulge in “blaming the victim” politics or to be soft on evil, but it is a willingness to get down and do the hard work of drawing an offender back into the circle of the community.  It is a loving refusal to give up even on the wickedest of people.  For Jesus, forgiveness is a kind of absolute.  When Peter asked the Lord how many times he should forgive his brother, Jesus replied “seventy times seven times,” a Semiticism for “always, always, always.” 

On the tenth anniversary of September 11th 2001, we should remember, we should be angry at the gross injustice done that day, and we should forgive.  

Father Robert Barron is the founder of the global ministry, Word on Fire, and is the Rector/President of Mundelein Seminary near Chicago. He is the creator of the documentary series, "Catholicism," airing on PBS stations and EWTN. The documentary has been awarded an esteemed Christopher for excellence. Learn more about the series at www.CatholicismSeries.com
« Previous entry     Back to index     Next entry »
Ads by Google
(What's this?)
blog comments powered by Disqus

RESOURCES »

Ads by Google (What's this?)
Ads by Google (What's this?)

Featured Videos

Pope Francis celebrates the closing Mass and announces site of next World Youth Day
Pope Francis celebrates the closing Mass and announces site of next World Youth Day
Pope Francis visits poor neighborhood and meets with young people from Argentina
Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the National Shrine of Our Lady of Aparecida
Denver rally draws hundreds in support of religious freedom
Pope Francis prays over a sick man in St Peter's Square
Denver women's clinic will offer natural, Catholic care
Interview Clips: Barbara Nicolosi speaks to CNA
US Cardinals press conference at North American College
Pope Benedict to retire to monastery inside Vatican City
Pope cites waning strength as reason for resignation
Hundreds convene in Denver to urge respect for life
New Orange bishop encourages Catholic unity in diversity
Chinese pro-life activist calls for reform, international attention
At Lincoln installation, Bishop Conley says holiness is success
Mother Cabrini shrine reopens in Chicago after a decade
Ordination of 33 deacons fills St. Peter's with joy
Cardinal says "Charity is the mother of all the virtues"
Augustine Institute expands evangelization effort with new campus
Bishops recall 'Way of St. James' as chance to trust in God
Los Angeles cathedral's newest chapel houses Guadalupe relic
Apr
21

Liturgical Calendar

April 21, 2014

Monday within the Octave of Easter

All readings:
Today »
This year »

Catholic Daily

Gospel of the Day

Mt 28:8-15

Gospel
Date
04/21/14
04/20/14
04/19/14

Daily Readings


First Reading:: Acts 2:14, 22-33
Gospel:: Mt 28:8-15

Saint of the Day

Holy Thursday »

Saint
Date
04/21/14

Homily of the Day

Mt 28:8-15

Homily
Date
04/21/14
04/20/14
04/19/14

Ads by AdsLiveMedia.com

Ads by AdsLiveMedia.com
     HTML
Text only
Headlines
  

Follow us: