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February 05, 2015
Why Suffering?
By Bishop Arthur Serratelli

Nestled in the foothills of the Pyrenees in southwestern France is the small town of Lourdes. Its population of 15,000 swells every tourist season to more than 5,000,000. Lourdes has more hotels per square kilometer than any other city in France except Paris. Ever since the apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary to Bernadette Soubirous on Feb. 11, 1858, there have been more than 200 million people who have come to pray at this shrine.

The crippled and the blind, the healthy and the sick, the...

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February 05, 2015
If God is good, why is there so much suffering in the world?
By Msgr. M. Francis Mannion

Of all the agonized questions posed to me over the years, none is more difficult to answer than the problem of suffering. Here is my attempt at an answer.

According to the Book of Genesis, the world God created was the perfect world of paradise. But with the sin of Adam and Eve, the world fell from its original perfection, and the whole order which God created unraveled. Human history, both at the human and natural levels, has since then experienced suffering, evil, and tragedy.

In his...

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February 04, 2015
Boys and Girls Town and the Cristo Rey Schools
By Sr. Joan L. Roccasalvo, C.S.J.

Catholic education begins with the early Church which took Jesus as its exemplar.  Not only was he a rabbi, a person of the book and the beneficiary of Jewish study and scholarship but also the divine teacher, “the truth,” and “the wisdom of God” (Jn 14:7; 1 Cor 1:24; Matt 28:19-20). He gave the disciples the mandate “to go and teach all nations.” Here the Church exercises its divine mandate and mission “which entitles it to precedence over all other agencies regarding final...

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February 02, 2015
Willful blindness
By Alice von Hildebrand

One of the episodes in the Gospel that always moved me particularly is the story of the blind man of Jericho: upon hearing that Christ had just arrived in town, he cried loudly: ‘Lord have pity on me.’ He was told to keep quiet, but he cried all the louder. Christ came to him, and asked him what he wanted: the answer was clear; "that I may see." He was healed.

A blind man knows that he is blind; he is aware that he has a serious deficiency. Those who dedicate their lives to helping the...

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January 30, 2015
Movie Review: "Black Or White"
By Carl Kozlowski

Amid an era in which racial tensions are boiling over more than they have in decades, America is looking for positive solutions to calm the storms. The movie “Selma” has come into sharp cultural focus as a result, due to its stirring depiction of Dr. Martin Luther King’s historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.
 
Yet while that film does manage to bring those past dramatic incidents to vibrant life, there is still a need for filmmakers to address what’s...

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January 29, 2015
Eight Hundred Years of Prayer: Lawyers, Faith, and the Common Good
By Bishop James D. Conley

The Catholic tradition of the Red Mass dates back to the year 1245, when the Bishop of Paris brought together the lawyers and law students working in his city to pray that the Holy Spirit would bless them with wisdom and good counsel. The Church has been praying for holy and virtuous lawyers for eight hundred years. Maybe another eight hundred years will finally do the trick!

As attorneys, your call is to serve the Lord in the life of the mind and in the forum of civil government and public...

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January 29, 2015
Housework can be a source of profound spirituality
By Msgr. M. Francis Mannion

One of the projects I have been undertaking in my spare time over the past month or so is going through my library and separating the books I want to keep from those I want to, well, get rid of.

One of the nice things about this project is rediscovering books that I read years ago but had forgotten. One such book is by Kathryn Allen Rabuzzi entitled, The Sacred and the Feminine: Toward a Theology of Housework. I recommend this book (published in 1982, but still in print) to anyone looking for...

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January 28, 2015
A man of frugal speech
By Sr. Joan L. Roccasalvo, C.S.J.

He is honored as a Doctor of the Church, the Angelic Doctor, the Church’s “very own theologian and philosopher,” and patron of Catholic schools and universities.

Today is the feast day of St. Thomas Aquinas, Dominican friar, priest, philosopher, and theologian.  He died in 1274 when he was not quite fifty, leaving his unfinished magnum opus, the Summa Theologiae.  Down through the centuries, college students and scholars alike have poured over this masterpiece of clarity, line by...

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January 26, 2015
The light that the recent Extraordinary Synod offers us
By Fr. José Noriega, DCJM

What  light can we gather from the recent Synod? Never before has a synod received so much attention. It has aroused many hopes and it has revealed real problems.

1. The hopes that the Synod aroused

a. The recent synod is not a rare bird. It is within the interest of the Vatican Council II to approach modern man: Gaudium et spes spoke of the family as the first point of dialogue between the Church and the world. St. John Paul II’s first synod was about the family and he accompanied it...

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January 24, 2015
Movie Review: 'Mortdecai'
By Carl Kozlowski

Johnny Depp has had a rough time in the last couple of years, with a string of bombs including “The Lone Ranger” and “Transcendence.” Now, he’s returned as yet another in his endless string of oddball characters in “Mortdecai,” an art-heist farce that I’ll admit most critics have derided but which I - and the audience of regular folks that I saw it with - laughed heartily at.

It stars Depp as Charlie Mortdecai, a wealthy yet financially imperiled and shady art dealer who...

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