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Video game giant funds fake Christian protest of ‘Inferno’ game
EA's Logo for the video game Dante's Inferno
EA's Logo for the video game Dante's Inferno

.- Video game giant Electronic Arts has admitted it funded a group of fake protesters who pretended to be Christians as a publicity stunt to spur interest in its upcoming action game very loosely based on Dante’s “Inferno.”

The game company hired a group of almost 20 people to stand outside the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles on Wednesday, the Associated Press says. The phony protesters passed out amateurish material and held signs bearing slogans such as “Trade in Your PlayStation for a PrayStation,” “Hell is not a Game” and “EA = Electronic Anti-Christ.”

Holly Rockwood, an EA spokeswoman, said the charade was arranged by a viral marketing agency hired by the company.

A web page in the crude style of 1990s web design was also created in connection with the stunt. It depicted crosses crushing the word “sin” and placed images of the King James Bible among phony condemnations and thinly-veiled promotions of the game.

“A video game hero does not have the authority to save and damn... ONLY GOD CAN JUDGE. and he will not judge the sinners who play this game kindly,” the site said.

EA’s video game “Dante’s Inferno” claims to be inspired by the first book of Dante Alighieri’s theological poem “The Divine Comedy.” Its character uses a cross as a weapon.

While Dante’s epic poem placed his beloved Beatrice in Paradise, the EA game makes its Dante character rescue Beatrice’s soul from Lucifer, USA Today says.

"We've tried to faithfully recreate the geography of hell as he wrote about it," the game’s executive producer Jonathan Knight told USA Today.

Dante Alighieri’s “Inferno” depicts various circles of hell in which sinners are punished according to their defining sins.

Dante placed the fraudulent and the sowers of discord in the penultimate Eighth Circle.

In the Divine Comedy the Inferno is followed by the “Purgatorio,” a poetic exploration of purgatory, and then by the “Paradiso,” Dante’s depiction of the blessed in heaven.

He closes the “Paradiso” by exalting God as “the Love which moves the sun and the other stars.”

EA has not announced any sequels to its game.


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July 24, 2014

Thursday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time

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Mt 13:10-17

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First Reading:: Jer 2: 1-3, 7-8, 12-13
Gospel:: Mt 13: 10-17

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St. Charbel Makhlouf »

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Mt 13:10-17

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