The cast of the third season of Star Trek. Source: http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn13/etmassey/star-trek-cast.jpg

The cast of the third season of Star Trek. Source: http://i300.photobucket.com/albums/nn13/etmassey/star-trek-cast.jpg

The Pope’s daily newspaper, L’Osservatore Romano praised Star Trek in its Friday edition as the T.V. show celebrates 50 years since its launch in 1966.

Giuseppe Fiorentino, the author of the brief tribute, said that the show provided people with a model of peaceful cooperation during a time of increased global tensions.

The show’s pilot episode, “The Cage” aired Sept. 8, 1966 – in the midst of the Vietnam War, the Cold War, and the Civil Rights movement.

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“Millions of people loved the intergalactic adventures of Captain Kirk and his faithful crew because during those years of the Cold War – while builders of atomic bomb shelters were raking in money, especially in the U.S. – ‘Star Trek’ presented a model of true cooperation,” Fiorentino wrote.

For Captain Kirk and crew aboard the Starship Enterprise, the goal of their various voyages as “to propose peaceful relations (built) on a foundation of equality.”

The diversity of the cast, which included an African American woman, a Japanese man, and a human-alien hybrid (Spock), which was remarkable amidst the Civil Rights movement and so soon after war with Japan during World War II.

“Today it might seem totally normal, but it’s important to remember that America at the time had recently emerged from a bloody war fought against Japan, too, and it was marked by deep racial tensions,” Fiorentino wrote.

In the way that the show portrayed these themes of cooperation in spite of diversity, it was “completely human, that is, searching for new ways to understand ourselves – a journey that we must always be undertaking.”

 

 

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