Loading
Pope media frenzy shows Church's relevance, author notes
By Hillary Senour
St. Peter's Square. Credit: Camille King (CC BY-SA 2.0).
St. Peter's Square. Credit: Camille King (CC BY-SA 2.0).

.- The unprecedented level of media devoted to the election of Pope Francis is a clear indicator of the importance of the Church today, a Catholic author and blogger reflected.

“The main thing that struck me is what I'd call the paradox of irrelevancy,” Brandon Vogt told CNA March 14, “which is the world saying the Church is irrelevant but then turning its attention to the Church.”

In the weeks leading up to Pope Francis' election, Vogt noted that much of the commentary from the secular press focused on how “outdated” and “unimportant” the Church is, yet when it came time for the conclave “all heads turn towards Rome.”

“Before the conclave you have this great accusation of irrelevance,” he explained, “but, paradoxically, at the conclave you have the most relevant event to the entire world.”

“I think what it shows is that deep down,” Vogt said, “the secular world knows that the Church is relevant.”

The 26-year-old blogger is author of the acclaimed 2011 book, “The Church in the New Media.” His work has been featured in NPR, FoxNews, EWTN, Our Sunday Visitor and National Review.

As news of the white smoke indicating the election of a new Pontiff broke, Vogt said he was shocked by the reaction he saw not only from the secular media, but also from non-Catholic friends in social media.

Vogt, who converted to Catholicism five years ago, said he was surprised to see that even his Protestant friends shared in the “exhilaration and excitement” of the Catholic Church.

Even people in circles who would say that the Holy Father is “not important” or even “a spiritually dangerous figure” watched the results with the “same enthusiasm” as Catholics, Vogt said.

“I think that all people, Catholics and non-Catholics, ultimately sense the transcendence of this event,” he said. “They all know that something is going on that is bigger than us, that is bigger than America, that’s bigger than the secular media (and is) something beyond our control and understanding.”

Although the selection process of a new pontiff is “shut off from the world,” the “universality” of the Church was apparent in how the process brought “the world together as a community.”

In the past, people may have gathered to watch the announcement on television, but most likely one would have learned of the news via radio or newspaper and then discussed it days later with friends or family.

This time, however, as soon as Pope Francis “stepped down to the balcony,” Vogt said, “friends and I were automatically exchanging pictures and articles and commentary.”

That kind of communication and interaction “has never happened before.”

Vogt said social media helped “echo” the universality of the Church as reaction to the first non-European Pope of the modern era flooded the internet.

Within the first hour of the Argentine's pontificate, Vogt said he was able to witness celebrations all over Latin America, read commentary from authors throughout Europe and view pictures from Africa.

Taking the example of the conclave and election of Pope Francis, Vogt said that even if the public and the media does not, “understand that it’s God behind it” the attention is received shows that “they sense the majesty, the beauty, the brilliance (and) the tradition of something great.”

Tags: Conclave, Pope Francis


Ads by AdsLiveMedia(What's this?)

* The number of messages that can be online is limited. CNA reserves the right to edit messages for content and tone. Comments and opinions expressed by users do not necessarily reflect the opinions or beliefs of CNA. CNA will not publish comments with abusive language, insults or links to other pages

RESOURCES »

Ads by Google (What's this?)

Featured Videos

The renewal of the Legionaries of Christ
The renewal of the Legionaries of Christ
Presentation of the book "The Pastor"
Synod on the Family October 2014
Preferential option for the poor
God is alive, even in sport
'A forbidden God' named Best Film at the International Catholic Film Festival
Vatican backs a 'Pause for Peace' during World Cup final
The effects of religious violence in Sarajevo 
The origin of Corpus Christi 
Corpus Christi at the Vatican 
Homage to an Indian Cardinal
Train of the Child's Light
New book explaining gestures of the Mass
Encounter between Pope Francis and the Charismatic Renewal in the Spirit Movement.
Religious tensions subside amid Balkan floods
John Paul II Center for Studies on Marriage and Family
Saint John Paul II on cartoon
Syrian Christian refugees
Papal Foundation Pilgrimage
Exorcism or prayer of liberation?
Jul
23

Liturgical Calendar

July 23, 2014

Wednesday of the Sixteenth Week in Ordinary Time

All readings:
Today »
This year »

Catholic Daily

Gospel of the Day

Mt 13:1-9

Gospel
Date
07/23/14
07/20/14
07/19/14

Daily Readings


First Reading:: Jer 1:1, 4-10
Gospel:: Mt 13: 1-9

Saint of the Day

St. John Cassian »

Saint
Date
07/23/14

Homily of the Day

Mt 13:1-9

Homily
Date
07/23/14
07/21/14
07/20/14

Ads by AdsLiveMedia.com

Ads by AdsLiveMedia.com
     HTML
Text only
Headlines
  

Follow us: